Brain Health First and Foremost

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also known as concussion, is frequently referred to as a silent epidemic because the problems that result from it often are not visible.

In sports, the current diagnostic paradigm is dependent on either a player self-reporting or a sideline observation which prompts evaluation through a paper and pencil assessment tool known as SCAT5 (Sport Concussion Assessment Tool). We believe this antiquated protocol is due for a new automated platform incorporating a physiologically relevant real-time diagnostic.

For the military, members are increasingly deployed to areas where they are at risk for experiencing blast exposure from improvised explosive devices (IEDs), suicide bombers, land mines, mortar rounds, and rocket-propelled grenades. These and other combat related activities put our military service members at increased risk for sustaining TBIs. Again, the diagnostic paradigm is dependent on either a service member self-reporting or team member observation. The military is actively seeking new technologies to improve the ability to detect and assess a concussion injury.

Photo by zabelin/iStock / Getty Images
Photo by zabelin/iStock / Getty Images

Military

TBI is a significant health issue for service men and women due to injuries that occur during training and military operations. The impact of which affects the level of unit readiness and troop retention. The Army has noted that combat medics need to be able to accurately and objectively assess soldiers with mild to moderate TBI.

Photo by julos/iStock / Getty Images
Photo by julos/iStock / Getty Images

Athletes

Several contact sports (e.g. football, hockey, lacrosse, and wrestling) are known for high rates of concussion. While improved gear, stronger regulations, and player education has helped with raising awareness, there is a diagnostic void for proper identification of players affected by a concussion.